Traumatic Experiences May Be Associated With Lower Levels of Sex Hormones

Summary: A history of trauma is associated with lower estrone and estradiol concentrations in middle-aged women, particularly those suffering from sleep deprivation or other sleep disorders.

Source: NAMES

Traumatic experiences are associated with a range of negative mental and physical health consequences.

A new study suggests they may also be linked to lower levels of sex hormones in middle-aged women — particularly those with shorter sleep periods.

Study results will be presented at the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting October 12-15, 2022 in Atlanta.

Previous research has shown that psychological trauma has the potential to suppress ovarian function and reduce ovarian estrogen secretion. However, the relationship between trauma and sex hormones in middle-aged women is still largely unknown.

Also Read :  RQI CEF: A Worthwhile REIT Fund (NYSE:RQI)

A new University of Pittsburgh study of 260 postmenopausal women examined whether traumatic experiences were related to estrogen levels (estradiol, estrone) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and whether this association was influenced by sleep duration.

This shows the outlines of two heads
Previous research has shown that psychological trauma has the potential to suppress ovarian function and reduce ovarian estrogen secretion. The image is in the public domain

The researchers found that women with a history of trauma had lower levels of estrogen, including estradiol and estrone, compared to women without such a history. There was no association between trauma and FSH levels.

Also Read :  'Sex and the City' star, '70s disco diva are latest 'Masked Singer' reveals

The findings were not explained by any depressive or post-traumatic stress symptoms, vasomotor symptoms, or the length of a woman’s postmenopause.

The relationship between trauma and hormones depended on how much women slept: women with a history of trauma who slept less than 6 hours a night had particularly low estrogen levels.

See also

This shows a woman drinking her morning coffee

“This work underscores the importance of trauma in relation to midlife health, particularly given the sensitivity of women’s health to hormones.” Mary Carson, lead author of the study, from the University of Pittsburgh.

“This study shows how important it is for healthcare professionals to have a good understanding of a patient’s medical history, including any traumatic experiences. This history could help identify women at increased risk for certain health problems and allow for the introduction of prevention strategies,” says Dr. Stephanie Faubion, Medical Director of NAMS.

Also Read :  Combining HIIT with 10-hour diet helps you lose TWICE as much weight

About this trauma and news from hormone research

Author: Mary Nance
Source: NAMES
Contact: Mary Nance—NAMS
Picture: The image is in the public domain

Original research: The results will be presented at the 2022 North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting.

Source

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.